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The Aiken County Historical Museum will hold a closing reception for the traveling exhibit, “The Sharing Project,” from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday at the museum at 433 Newberry St. S.W. The exhibit features a video about Happyville, an agricultural community established by Russian Jewish immigrants in Montmorenci in the early 1900s.

Sharing is the theme of a multimedia, traveling exhibit ending Sunday at the Aiken County Historical Museum.

Visitors to the closing reception for the installation will learn about a little-known Jewish commune in Montmorenci and can participate in a food drive to share food with the hungry in their communities.

The reception for “The Sharing Project” will be from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday at the museum at 433 Newberry St. S.W.

Conceived by Winston-Salem-based artist and professor Joel Tauber, the exhibit asks the questions: How and why do we share in our lives, according to the museum's website.

The central video of the exhibit details Tauber's visit to Happyville, a Russian-Jewish agricultural community that existed in Montmorenci in the early 20th century.

From 1905 to 1908, about 50 immigrants lived in the community, where they planted crops, harvested the land’s timber and dammed a creek to power a cotton gin to remove seeds from cotton.

In addition to the videos, the exhibit features a canned food drive. The food will be given to people in need at the close of the reception.

The Aiken County Historical Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 803-642-2015.

Admission is free.

Want to go?

WHAT: Closing reception for The Sharing Project

WHEN: 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday

WHERE: The Aiken County Historical Museum, 433 Newberry St. S.W.

COST: Admission is free, but canned goods will be collected for a food drive

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call 803-642-2015

Larry Wood covers education for the Aiken Standard.

A native of Aiken, Larry Wood covers education for the Aiken Standard.