Technology in the classroom at the center of teacher Tech Fest

  • Posted: Friday, March 7, 2014 9:09 p.m.
    UPDATED: Friday, March 7, 2014 10:44 p.m.
STAFF PHOTO BY ROB NOVIT
Stacy Morris, left, and Rebecca Long, Clearwater Elementary School teachers, learn how Legos can be used productively in classrooms to support STEM lessons – science, technology, engineering and math. Scores of teachers attended a Tech Fest event earlier this week.
STAFF PHOTO BY ROB NOVIT Stacy Morris, left, and Rebecca Long, Clearwater Elementary School teachers, learn how Legos can be used productively in classrooms to support STEM lessons – science, technology, engineering and math. Scores of teachers attended a Tech Fest event earlier this week.

At a Tech Fest hosted by the Aiken County School District on Tuesday, two J.D. Lever Elementary School teachers might have attracted a lot of intrigued educators to their presentation with the name Baby Flips.

The program – provided by fourth-grade teachers Becky Hare and Phyllis Jones – had no connections with babies and gymnastics.

Baby Flips, a title they selected, was about the introduction of information through websites and pre-recorded videos before students participate in classroom activities.

As a result, “traditional class time is used for active problem-solving and one-to-one or small-group tutoring with the teacher,” Hare said.

About two dozen teachers and other educators discussed a wide range of topics related to technology during the program held at Aiken High School.

Tech Fest was introduced 11 years ago, said Ashlee Logan, a School District technology specialist.

When she and colleague Terry Hallman took on those roles three years earlier, “we saw the potential that education technology does matter as to what students could do,” Logan said. “Technology is not there just for the teacher to lecture. It’s really supposed to be in students’ hands so they can demonstrate what they learn.”

Sarah Emerling and Jennifer Watkins, K-5 teachers at Busbee Corbett Elementary Middle School, discussed their presentation called Creation-Based Learning Using the iPad.

Through a small number of apps, students can create a finished product of photographs or video to demonstrate their learning.

Education is all about ownership and whether or not students own their learning, Emerling said by email.

She challenges her young special education children to participate, she said.

“My children have just finished their final project on area and perimeter,” Emerling said. “They created their own tutorials, teaching others the definitions and formulas – showing examples of finding area and perimeter.”

Senior writer Rob Novit is the Aiken Standard’s education reporter.

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