The glaring mistakes associated with the Obamacare rollout will only make things harder for South Carolina democrats in 2014.


These missteps and the character issues now facing the White House can easily be seen as leverage for the state’s republicans, who already have a leg up with control of nearly all statewide offices.


President Obama admitted in a press conference last week that he and his administration had “fumbled” the health care law rollout. It’s now clear in the minds of the public, and hopefully the president, that the White House should have gotten this right from day one.


Consequently, it’s a low point for Obama’s legacy and one that comes at a critical point with the 2014 mid-term elections around the corner. Obama’s problems continue to be two-fold. First, he’s lost the trust of the majority of Americans. In a recent Quinnipiac poll, only 44 percent of the country views the president as honest and trustworthy. That’s down 10 points from Oct. 1 when 54 percent viewed him as such. Second, Americans are also undoubtedly questioning the White House’s competence to a greater extent. These concerns don’t appear to be going anyone any time soon.


Of course, politics is dynamic, and the prospects for democrats in South Carolina may be become brighter as Nov. 2014 draws closer.


Gov. Nikki Haley isn’t infallible and hasn’t been free of controversy during her time in office. Also, any major issue that crops up on the state level should hopefully trump national politics at the ballot box. However, the dynamics at the national level will have to change for state democrats to have a more favorable outlook. First and foremost, the federal health care website has to be fixed. With the resources available to correct the glitches, it seems likely that will happen. But even with a workable website, Obama has left a colossal mess for members of his own party.


Thirty-nine Congressional democrats have already jumped ship on the idea of Obamacare after supporting a new U.S. House bill aimed at aiding canceled policyholders. There has undoubtedly been a drop in public trust, and lawmakers in Washington are hearing that from their constituents.


Is it fair to attach that to Sen. Vincent Sheheen should he be the democratic pick for governor? No. However, he’s already opened the door to be portrayed a certain way by the State GOP after he came out in support of a temporary expansion of Medicaid.The chances are very high that Obama’s missteps will remain salient and in the public conscience by November 2014, and likely for years after. Consequently, some voters will continue to look at democrats in the state through the prism of the Obama administration.


The chances are very high that Obama’s missteps will remain salient and in the public conscience by November 2014, and likely for years after. Consequently, some voters will continue to look at democrats in the state through the prism of the Obama administration.


With such a political outlook, it will require a very nuanced approached for a democratic candidate to make any inroads in a statewide race in South Carolina.