BOSTON COLLEGE 75, CLEMSON 68

By KEN POWTAK


Associated Press


BOSTON — Freshman Joe Rahon scored a season-high 26 points and Boston College snapped a five-game losing streak with a 75-68 win over Clemson despite nearly blowing a 17-point lead in the closing 5½ minutes.


The Eagles (10-11, 2-6 Atlantic Coast Conference) surpassed their victory total of last season, when they went 9-22.


Lonnie Jackson nailed four clutch free throws to finish with 14 points for Boston College, and Ryan Anderson had a pair of key baskets late and scored 12 points.


Devin Booker scored 19 points and became the 36th player in Clemson history to reach the 1,000-point plateau, joining older brother Trevor (2009) as the second brother combo in school history. Randy and Richie Mahaffey did it in the 1960s.


The Tigers (12-9, 4-5) were shooting near 30 percent until they started to hit from long range in the closing 7 minutes, but it came too late.


Clemson’s poor start that frustrated coach Brad Brownell.


“We missed a bunch of makeable shots at the beginning of the game. A lot of them were very makeable,” he said. “Those are shots you just have to make to put pressure on the opponent. We made some – too little, too late.”


Milton Jennings had 13 points and Jordan Roper 11 for the Tigers, who had won their last two games.


Jackson’s 3-pointer from the left wing gave BC a 65-48 lead, but the Tigers scored the next 13 points, slicing the deficit to four on Jennings’ jumper with 2:32 left.


Adonis Filer’s 3 cut it to 67-66 with 75 seconds left, but Anderson followed with a layup off Rahon’s pass on the Eagles’ ensuing possession. Anderson’s layup came after his jumper from the wing gave BC a 67-61 edge, snapping a scoreless stretch of nearly 4 minutes.


Jennings’ long 3-point attempt then went off the front rim before Jackson sealed it by hitting four free throws in the final 30 seconds.


The Tigers fell to 4-7 in games away from Littlejohn Coliseum.


“We didn’t come out ready to play and, sure we made a late run, but it wasn’t enough,” Roper said. “You just have to come out and play your best.”