There are 11 days left to register to vote in the Nov. 6 general election.


After Saturday, Oct. 6, if you haven’t taken the time to register, you won’t be able to participate. You won’t get to vote for President of the United States, for state and local officer holders, or even help decide if the state Constitution is changedsto that the governor and lieutenant governor run on the same ticket.


The right to vote is a sacred privilege in this country. It’s a right people have fought and died for and one we instill the importance of in our children.


The Founding Fathers opposed British rule of the colonies – they were taxed without any representation in a government across the ocean. Over the centuries, women fought for the right to vote. Blacks fought for the right, and then later fought against unfair requirements that kept them from voting. Because it wasn’t fair to send 18-year-olds to war but not let them vote, now eligible 18, 19 and 20-year-olds can cast ballots.


With the right to vote, comes the responsibility to vote. Exercise your right to say how your taxes are used, what direction the country goes or what our moral compass will be.


It’s also your right not to vote, but with that you take what you get. The government you didn’t bother to help select triples your taxes, shuts down all public works and declares school unnecessary – oh well, live with it.


Registering is easy.You can register at the county board of elections in the county where to you live. You can download a form from www.scvotes.org and fax, mail or email a completed copy.


If you haven’t registered, take a few minutes to get registered.


And come Nov. 6, be sure to cast your ballot.